Sorrentolens

Photos and thoughts; Cars; 1950s; 1960s

Archive for the ‘MA’ Category

William Bowe and Rachel Leah

with 9 comments

Rachel Leah Hyannis

Written by sorrentolens

September 22, 2010 at 3:41 pm

Cape Cod Light – Highland Light

with one comment

Highland Light

Atlantic at Highland Light

Written by sorrentolens

September 6, 2010 at 4:47 pm

Red Sox

with 5 comments

Red Sox

Written by sorrentolens

August 15, 2010 at 5:50 pm

Something to say

with 2 comments

Not me, the owner of this VW bus in Chatham, MA.

Somethin' to say

In 1927, Henry Ford changed the way we got from point A to point B. We replaced the horse and carriage with the Model A and then we quickly found a way to turn these metal contraptions into a new way to express our opinions. Henry Ford also did something else for us with the automobile. He put them out for thousands of people to purchase and as people began to have accidents, he added the bumper to provide some protection to the front and back of the car. Combine this bumper with America’s desire for free speech and people found a new way to advertise their products and ideas.

The first bumper “stickers” were made of cardboard and metal. These were then connected by wire and string. In fact, they looked more like a license plate than a sticker. Nevertheless, these were the forerunners of bumper stickers, as we know them today.

A change to the way bumper stickers were made would come later. In the 1930’s, Forest P. Gill worked for the Crawford Manufacturing Company in Kansas City, Missouri. The company had been making canvas items such as seat and tire covers. The canvas was a sturdy material that was also very versatile, as it could be printed on with ink through silkscreening. These inks were different from the dyes that had been used in the past, as the dyes would fade or run in the sunlight or rain. As a result, the canvas turned out to be an excellent option for printed advertisements for the outdoors. Soon, canvas was used for outdoor advertisements on the canvas awnings that went over store windows and later they were used for covering spare tires and turning those into advertisements as well.

After the Crawford Manufacturing Company went out of business, Gill chose to go into business for himself. Gill received some printing equipment from his ex-employer and began a printing business in the basement of his home in 1934.

Gill struggled to make ends meet and printed everything from bumper signs to can labels. The prints were treated with chemicals to keep them from running and to withstand the weather. As Gill’s operation grew, he had to hire employees. Gill moved out of the basement to 906 Central in Kansas City. The shop was right down the block from the Hotel Savoy, where Harry Truman would lunch at the Savoy Grill.

Later in 1946, a new trend in inks and dyes came about. The Switzer Brother’s Inc. located in Cleveland, Ohio created these. They introduced new colors that were called DayGlo because of their bright, glowing appearance during the day. Gill soon began experimenting with these new inks and creating signs with them. These inks were very eye catching and advertisers wanted to use them to draw more attention.

At the same time, another revelation was being created. This revelation was a new sticky-backed paper that became available to commercial printers. On the back of these papers, a backing could be pulled off and the paper could then be stuck to a smooth surface. Up to that point, silk screen stickers had only be used with water-activated gum papers, but these couldn’t hold up in weather and fell apart over time.

Elsewhere in Kansas City, a printer told Gill about a company that used independent salesmen to advertise products that were sold in regional territories by traveling salesman door to door. Gill contacted the Nationwide Advertising Specialty Company located in Arlington, Texas. The company helped Gill to create an ad that would advertise bumper stickers to the sales reps who could then sell them to various places, such as tourist destinations. The bumper sticker quickly became the perfect souvenir as people purchased cars after the war.

The first bumper stickers were printed on blue and black backgrounds. The ink was fluorescent and they brightly announced where the family had been vacationing. They soon helped to spread the word about tourist destinations located across the country. To advertise himself, Gill placed the name of his company on the very bottom of the bumper stickers he printed. This launched a product that would soon become part of our democracy and the become an symbol of the first amendment.

===John Fischer at ezinearticles.com

Written by sorrentolens

July 27, 2010 at 7:48 pm

Provincetown – All in a Row

with 2 comments

Provincetown - All in a Row

Written by sorrentolens

July 24, 2010 at 5:43 pm

Sailing, Sails, Yachts, Yacht Clubs, Harbors

with 4 comments


Sailing

Neither Out Far Nor In Deep

The people along the sand

All turn and look one way.
They turn their back on the land.
They look at the sea all day.

As long as it takes to pass
A ship keeps raising its hull;
The wetter ground like glass
Reflects a standing gull

The land may vary more;
But wherever the truth may be–
The water comes ashore,
And the people look at the sea.

They cannot look out far.
They cannot look in deep.
But when was that ever a bar
To any watch they keep?

~ ~ Robert Frost

Indian Harbor Yacht Club - Greenwich, CT

IHYC - Greenwich, Connecticut

In Greenwich Harbor - Connecticut

Sleeping Sails - West Dennis, MA

In Hyannis Harbor - Cape Cod - Massachusetts

In Wychmere Harbor - Harwichport - Cape Cod - Massachusetts

Wychmere Harbor - Harwichport, Massachusetts

I hope you all enjoy these — they mean a lot to me……………

Written by sorrentolens

July 11, 2010 at 3:39 pm

Quick update from the road

with 4 comments

I’ve been without realiable internet connectivity while in Cape Cod this week — so there you have my reason for not posting photos, thoughts and other outbursts.

Just quickly — Had a wonderful time in Greenwich and other parts of Connecticut… My daughter poured her love on me by treating her Pop to belated Father’s Day gifts from J. Press – (will show some of that later). Met up with KSA from the Legions of the Lost Ones – he’s a good guy! Also met up with a friend that I’m proud to say that I’ve had for 51 years. We had a wonderful dinner at their home, then off to New Haven for pizza at Pepe’s with my sister, neices, nephews, cousins, and friends — it was all good.

Three days in Cape Cod, shopping, P-Town, Nantucket, Clams, Lobsters, some great New England fish and chips from Baxters in Hyannis. I scored a pair of Nantucket Reds (at Murray’s Toggery Outlet – yes outlet! You wouldn’t believe what I paid for dem Reds!

Heading to Northern New York State very early Saturday morning.. its going to be about a 10 to 12 hour ride then it will be 4th of July festivities in Three Mile Bay, NY.

I’ll post up some pics in the next day of so – last count I snapped 440 photos in a week. I think I have some good ones for showing later after some post processing.

Everyone have a very Happy and Safe Indepence Day weekend!!!

By the way… I have an awful toothache! I’m eating a 1/2 pound of Advil a day and it still throbs!

Written by sorrentolens

July 2, 2010 at 8:05 pm

Like being there (sort of …)

with one comment

My younger sister always gets me Cape Cod Life for my birthday.  My second issue came in today’s mail.  I love reading through it, perusing the ads, the photos, the art and antiques.  It brings me back to much earlier times.  The last time I was on Cape Cod was 1984 – we rented a house for a week with the whole family.  We knew then that we’d be moving south to Florida at the new year.  I’ve been back north many times, but never back to “The Cape”.  In high school, we had a house in Wrinkle Point (Bass River).  I had a job (one of the worst!) washing dishes at the Riverview Lobster House in Yarmouth – it was close enough that I could walk to it.  I made enough money to buy a few things that summer (first madras jacket 🙂 ), but mostly what I wanted to do was just loaf – go to the beach – and just hang out (although I don’t think we said “hang out” back then).  Things took a nasty turn economically then (somewhat like these days), and my parents had to sell that house.  After I moved to Florida, my sisters continued to go to The Cape summers with their children and families.  I know they enjoyed it.

As I turn these pages – it brings me back . . .  Thank you M.A.

Cape Cod Life

Cape Cod Life

CCL inside 2

CCL inside 3

This is the tenth anniversary of John F Kennedy Jr’s passing.  I think of the Kennedys and Cape Cod Massachusetts as one.  Once our whole family went to Mass at St. Francis Xavier Church in Hyannis.  As we were leaving the Kennedys were coming in.  We took a photo – but it never came out.  That sure would have been a keeper – but eh – not in the cards.

John F Kennedy Jr

John F Kennedy Jr

When Richard Blow’s book American Son – A Portrait of John F Kennedy Jr came out in 2002 I snapped it up and read it quickly.  I was keenly interested in reading about John Jr.  I truly believe that Richard Blow was wrongly criticized for writing the book.  On the TV interview show The View – those farting hens (who never read the book) ripped Mr. Blow a “new one” and ever since I bash the show and its sagging troupe whenever the show is mentioned – they are a waste of time and airspace and provide little benefit to the public.  I remember writing to Mr. Blow through the publisher – actually thanking him for writing the book.  If he made money from it, so what, it really doesn’t matter does it?  JFK Jr is history, and history needs to be written.  Thank you again Richard!  Its a great book!

American Son - Portrait of John F Kennedy Jr

American Son - Portrait of John F Kennedy Jr